© 2013-2019 by Virtual Institute for Responsible Innovation

Hosted by the School for the Future of Innovation in Society

  • c-facebook
  • Twitter Classic
  • Google Classic

VIRI is supported by the National Science Foundation under collective agreement #1257246

Heather Douglas, Waterloo Chair in Science and Society in the Department of Philosophy at the University of Waterloo, is a philosopher of science who works at the science-policy interface.  Her research focuses on the role of values in science, science advising in democratic societies, and the moral responsibilities of scientists.  She is interested in the implications of the importance of values in science for the opportunities for democratic governance of science, including mechanisms for involving the public.  Her work, which has been supported by the National Science Foundation and the Social Science and Humanities Research Council of Canada, aims to bring insights from the social sciences, natural sciences, and humanities to address the challenge of responsible science in democratic societies.

VIRI Associate Director Heather Douglas is the Waterloo Chair in Science and Society in the Department of Philosopy at the University of Waterloo, Ontario, Canada.

Founding member

Selected RRI Publications

Douglas, Heather. 2013. "The Moral Terrain of Science." Erkenntnis 79 (5): 961-979.
http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007%2Fs10670-013-9538-0

 

Douglas, Heather. 2010. "Engagement for Progress: Applied Philosophy of Science in Context. Synthese 177: 317-335. http://www.jstor.org/discover/10.2307/40985707

 

Douglas, Heather. 2009. Science, Policy, and the Value-Free Ideal. Pittsburgh: University of Pittsburgh Press. http://www.jstor.org/discover/10.2307/40985707

 

Douglas. Heather. 2008. "The Role of Values in Expert Reasoning." Public Affairs Quarterly, 22 (1): 1-18. http://www.jstor.org/stable/40441475

 

Douglas, Heather. 2003. "The Moral Responsibilities of Scientists: Tensions Between Autonomy and Responsibility." American Philosophical Quarterly 40 (1): 59-68.  http://www.jstor.org/stable/20010097